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Will a magnet really destroy your smartphone?

  • Author:Esway
  • Source:www.eswaychina.com
  • Release on :2016-01-14

Will a magnet really destroy your smartphone?

 


Do magnets actually pose a terrifying risk to our gadgets, and where did we get the idea that they’re dangerous in the first place?

Let’s find out.

This more than likely stems from old electronic devices, such as CRT monitors and televisions, which were susceptible to magnetic fields, explains Matt Newby from first4magnets, "When placing a strong magnet near one of these you could distort the picture. Thankfully, modern televisions and monitors aren’t susceptible in this way."

Most modern electronics, like our smartphones, are not going to be adversely affected by small magnets; but is that all there is to it?

How do magnets affect smartphones?

The vast majority of magnets that you come across day to day, even many of the super-strong ones on the market, will have no adverse effect on your smartphone, says Matt, "In fact, within the device there will be a number of very small magnets which perform important functions.For example, the new Apple Watch uses a magnetic inductive wireless charging system."

However, before you get carried away and start rubbing magnets all over your smartphone, there is something else to consider.

Matt warned that magnetic fields can temporarily interfere with the digital compass and magnetometer inside your smartphone, and that’s more serious than you may think.

The engineers over at K&J Magnetics actually experimented with an iPhone to show how the sensors inside can be affected by a magnet.

The problem we found is that a nearby magnet will affect the internal magnetic sensors inside the phone. The compass won’t read correctly, explained Michael Paul, an engineer at K&J, "What’s worse, if you stick a strong magnet to the phone, you could slightly magnetize some steel components inside, making them act like weak magnets. This can make it difficult to properly calibrate the compass."

You might think it’s unimportant because you never use the compass app, but that doesn’t mean other apps aren’t relying on the same sensor.

Google (GOOGL, Tech30) Maps, for example, uses the sensor to detect which way the phone is facing, and a number of games also rely on it to work out your orientation.

It seems as though magnets aren’t likely to kill your smartphone, but there’s definitely a possibility they’ll mess some pretty important aspects up, so why take the risk?

 


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